Armadale & District War Memorial Association

Registered Scottish Charity No. SC044493

JOHN MALLACE

5th / 6th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          275494

Date of death              05/09/1918

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age

Resided                       Glasgow

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: IX. A. 2.

Cemetery: HEATH CEMETERY, HARBONNIERES   

 

John arrived in Egypt on 15th September 1915.

JOHN MARR

5th / 6th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          250302

Date of death              11/08/1918

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              23

Resided                      

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: V. E. 35.

Cemetery: BOUCHOIR NEW BRITISH CEMETERY   

Son of John Marr, of 4, Grange Loan, Edinburgh.

 

John was a Native of Armadale; his father prior to leaving Bathgate was Church Officer in St David’s U.F Church Bathgate.

John arrived at the Balkans (Gallipoli) 25th April 1915.

MATTHEW BAXTER MARSHALL

5th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Later

Army Service Corps

Motor Transport Section

Rank                           Private

Service number         

Date of death              06/04/1917

Place of birth               Armadale

Age                             

Resided                       Armadale

Enlisted

Theatre of death         Home

Grave/Memorial Reference:

Cemetery: BATHGATE CEMETERY

 

Matthew was the eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. John Marshall Station Road Armadale.

After a term at Armadale Public School, Matthew was transferred to Bathgate Academy to pursue his studies in the higher grade. He was specially successful in Mathematics and Nature Studies and in each of them won numerous prizes. After six years at the Academy, he entered University.

In 1915 whilst at University he joined the 5th (Queens Edinburgh Rifles) Royal Scots, but was later transferred to the Motor Transport Section.

Whilst in training in England in 1916, he was involved in a motor collision and as a result received serious injuries. On the 16th March 1917 Matthew was discharged from hospital, though still far from well, and he also received his medically unfit certificate from the Army. In late March 1917 he was admitted to Tippethill Hospital suffering from enteric, where he died some days later.

 

Matthew served 1 year 129 days in the Army.

WILLIAM MARSHALL

5th/6th Battalion

CAMERONIANS (Scottish Rifles)

Formerly 3621

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          202491

Date of death              14/04/1918

Place of birth               Kirkintilloch

Age

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: I. G. 194.

Cemetery: METEREN MILITARY CEMETERY 

DAVID SUTHERLAND MASON

5th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          1900

Date of death              19/06/1915

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              20

Resided                       Edinburgh

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: II. F. 7.

Cemetery: TWELVE TREE COPSE CEMETERY

Son of David and Janet Mason, of Armadale, West Lothian.

 

David arrived at the Balkans (Gallipoli) 25th April 1915.

  

David was born 5th May 1895 at St Agnes Cottage, South Street, Armadale.

His paternal grandfather William Mason ran the Railway Tavern in Bathgate and His maternal grandfather William Hamilton ran the Commercial Inn in Whitburn.

His father was David Sutherland Mason who was a Spirit Merchant and his mother was Janet Hamilton who was born in Armadale at Hamilton's Land in 1869.

 

As the family moved to Edinburgh, David’s name does not appear on the Armadale War Memorial.

 

David's brother William Mason served during the Great War with the Royal Army Medical Corps.

DAVID MARTIN

6/7th Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS

Rank                           Private

Service number          43208

Date of death              02/11/1916

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              20

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Linlithgow

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: Pier and Face 3 C.

Cemetery: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL        

Son of Mr. & Mrs. Martin 20 North Street, Armadale.

 

David enlisted in the 10th Royal Scots in November 1915, he was later transferred to the Royal Scots Fusiliers and went to France in July 1916.

Before enlisting David was employed as an apprentice engineer at Northrigg Colliery, Armadale. He was also a member of Armadale Public Band and played second cornet, he was the first member of the band to fall in action.

 

David Martin appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Bathville Colliery and being killed in action Somme

HENRY McADAM

12th Battalion

HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY

Rank                           Private

Service number          17532

Date of death              13/08/1916

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age

Resided                       Wishaw

Enlisted                       Dunoon

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: Pier and Face 15 C.

Cemetery: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL

 

Henry arrived in France on 11th July 1915.

KENNETH McALPINE

9th (Highlanders) Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          300654

Date of death              23/04/1917

Place of birth  

Age                              19

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: Bay 1 and 2.

Cemetery: ARRAS MEMORIAL        

Son of William McAlpine, of 150, Unity Terrace, Armadale, West Lothian.

 

 

Kenneth enlisted in the Royal Scots in 1914 when he was only 17 years old, he was later transferred to the “Dandy Ninth” and went to France in January 1916.

 

Mr. William McAlpine received official intimation that his son was reported wounded and missing on the 23rd April 1917, he was given no further details.

 

Kenneth was last seen by a chum retiring from the firing line wounded and going to the dressing station under a heavy fire. Nothing being heard of him since, it was feared he had been hit by a shell.

 

 

Kenneth appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Bathville Colliery. It does not state anything about him being killed.

WILLIAM McCLORY

2nd Battalion

KINGS OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS

Rank                           Lance Corporal

Service number          25406

Date of death              19/09/1918

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              22

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: XIII. C. 23.

Cemetery: GREVILLERS BRITISH CEMETERY        

Son of John and Catherine McClory, of 27 Bathville Row, Armadale, West Lothian.

 

Mrs. McClory received the following letter from Chaplain P J Roberts:

 

“19th September

 

Dear Mrs. McClory

            I very much regret to say that your dear son, Lance Corporal McClory, K.O.S.B was brought into hospital very seriously wounded in the chest on the 18th September. He was quite cheerful when brought in, and when I told him I write to you he said- “Tell her I am in the pink”, poor boy he was mortally wounded, but he would not have you think he was so ill. He was only a few hours in hospital. Everything possible was done to save his life, but he passed away peacefully in the early hours of this morning. He was buried today in a military cemetery. May the God of all comfort you and all who were dear to you son in your and their great hour of sorrow.”

 

William served over 2 years in the Army and he had been in France just over a year. He had been wounded once before earlier in the year and had returned to the fighting line in May.

 

Prior to enlisting William was employed as a brick moulder with Messrs Robertson, Love and Coy, Bathville.

 

William McClory appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Bathville Brickworks and dying of wounds Bapaume.

 

William was the only support of his aged parents, William’s brother Joseph also served in France, he enlisted when in Canada.

WILLIAM McCOLLUM

1st Battalion

Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

Rank                           Private

Service number          21927

Date of death              14/10/1918

Place of birth               Antrim

Age                              27

Resided                       Blackridge / Dundee

Enlisted                       Bathgate

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 70 to 72.

Cemetery: TYNE COT MEMORIAL       

 

William resided in Upper Craig Terrace before enlisting, at the time he was killed his wife and two children resided with her parents in Dundee.

 

William was employed in the Craig’s pits as a miner before he enlisted, he was one of the first locally to attest under the Derby scheme, and latterly joined the Army voluntarily.

 

William was the brother of Mr. George McCollum, 36 Victoria Street, Harthill.

EDWARD McCONNELL

1st Battalion

SCOTS GUARDS

Rank                           Guardsman

Service number          17101

Date of death              07/12/1918

Place of birth               Glasgow

Age

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F.& F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: III. D. 5.

Cemetery: MONS COMMUNAL CEMETERY        

ALEXANDER McCORD

15th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Lance Corporal

Service number          375165

Date of death              13/07/1918

Place of birth               Fauldhouse

Age                              24

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         Germany

Grave/Memorial Reference: IX. C. 2.

Cemetery: BERLIN SOUTH-WESTERN CEMETERY  

 

News was received through the Red Cross International Prisoners of War Agency by Mr.  & Mrs. William McCord, Westrigg that their son Alexander had died of wounds in Germany.

 

L/Cpl Alexander McCord was taken prisoner on the 22nd March 1918 during the German Offensive. He had sustained a fractured wrist and a fractured left upper thigh. It was the latter that proved fatal.

 

Alexander had sent a postcard and a letter from Germany during his first two or three months in Germany, but nothing was said about the seriousness of his injuries.

 

Alexander was a baker to trade, and after serving his apprenticeship with Mr. John Brown Blackridge, Alex moved to Mr. Kay, baker Whitburn. During his Army training at Berwick on tweed he was for 18 months officers cook, and continued in that capacity while in the front line. He had one brother also serving as a dispatch rider with the Tank Corps and two somewhere in England.

JOHN McCORMACK

B Company 12th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          251485

Date of death              12/10/1917

Place of birth               Cleland, Lanarkshire

Age                              20

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Linlithgow

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 11 to 14 and 162.

Cemetery: TYNE COT MEMORIAL        

 

Son of Mr. and Mrs. George McCormack, of 8, Barbauchlaw Avenue. Armadale, West Lothian.

ROBERT McCUBBIN

11th Service Ordnance Coy

ROYAL ARMY ORDANANCE CORPS

Rank                           Armament Quartermaster Sergeant

Service number          T/106

Date of death              31/07/1915

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              48

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Woolwich Kent

Medal Entitlement       1914 Star and Bar, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         Gallipoli

Grave/Memorial Reference: A. 59.

Cemetery: LANCASHIRE LANDING CEMETERY 

Son of John and Agnes Thornton McCubbin, of Armadale, West Lothian; husband of Louise M. A. Else (formerly McCubbin), of Ashfield House, High Rd. East Finchley, London.

 

Robert arrived in France on the 22nd August 1914.

JAMES McDERMID

16th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          25021

Date of death              30/11/1915

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age

Resided                      

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement      

Theatre of death         Home

Grave/Memorial Reference: A. 94/13.

Cemetery: LARBERT CEMETERY   

ADAM MacDONALD

65th Brigade

Royal Field Artillery

Rank                           Sergeant

Service number          7723

Date of death              23/05/1918

Decoration                  MM

Place of birth               Dykehead, Shotts

Age                              22

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Shotts, Lanarkshire

Medal Entitlement       Military Medal, 1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: V. L. 2.

Cemetery: ECOIVRES MILITARY CEMETERY, MONT-ST. ELOI

Son of Alexander and Jeanie MacDonald, of Mashona Cottage, South St., Armadale, Linlithgowshire.

     

Adam enlisted in September 1914, and he arrived in France on the 24th July 1915.

 

Adam was awarded the Military Medal in September 1917 as a Corporal whilst serving with a Heavy Trench Mortar Battery, later in the October he was wounded by shrapnel. Whilst home in December1917 on sick leave, he was honoured by the people of Dykehead and Shotts, who presented him with a gold hunting lever watch. He returned to France in January 1918.

 

Mrs Macdonald received the following letter from Major W Pollock:

25th May 1918

 

I very much regret having to inform you that your son Sergeant A MacDonald was killed in action, on the 2nd May. He was struck by an enemy shell. It may be some little consolation to you to know that he was spared any suffering, death being instantaneous. His body is interred in a military cemetery, where a cross will be erected on his grave. A burial service was conducted by an Army Chaplain. Sergeant MacDonald’s death is a great loss to the Battery. I had only recently promoted him Sergeant. He in every way justified promotion, he was a brave and gallant soldier, very much liked and respected by all the officers in the Battery. I very much regret his death, and write to convey my own sincere sympathy and that of all the Officers of the Battery, in the loss which you have sustained.

 

 

Adam was the cousin of John Muirhead MM Scots Guards, Armadale who was also killed whilst serving in France.

ALEXANDER McDONALD

11th Battalion

CAMERONIANS (SCOTTISH RIFLES)

Rank                           Sergeant

Service number          15049

Date of death              01/05/1917

Place of birth               Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Age

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         Salonica

Grave/Memorial Reference: A. 178.

Cemetery: KARASOULI MILITARY CEMETERY        

Husband of Christina McDonald, of 3 McDonald's Square, Armadale.

Son of Mr. and Mrs. McDonald, of Armadale;

 

Alexander enlisted in the Army in the Early Days of the War. For a time he was stationed with the 11th Cameronians at Sutton Veny, Warminster, Wiltshire. Alexander first saw service in France arriving on the 19th September 1915, he was in France for several months then he was drafted to Salonica, where he served for eighteen months.

 

Alexander for a couple of years worked in America.

 

During the period when Armadale Loyal Orange Lodge flute band was in existence, he for a time was a member of the committee, and because of that connection he was mulcted in, for a working man, a large amount, to meet the bill for bandsmen’s uniforms. This sum, it is hoped, members of the L.O.L will see is refunded to his widow and six children.

 

Sergeant McDonald was a keen angler, and for a long period was the secretary of the Armadale and District Angling Club.

 

Alex McDonald appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Blackrigg 1 Colliery and being killed in action

ALEXANDER McEWAN

2nd Battalion

ARGYLL & SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS

Rank                           Private

Service number          1097

Date of death              21/10/1914

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              23

Resided                       Glasgow

Enlisted                       Falkirk

Medal Entitlement       1914 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: F. 23.

Cemetery: LE TROU AID POST CEMETERY, FLEURBAIX  

Son of Robert and Hannah Lawson McEwan, of Crosscroes Rows, Avonbridge, Stirlingshire.

Native of Armadale, West Lothian.

 

Alexander arrived in France on the 10th August 1914.

DUNCAN McEWAN

2nd Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Lance Corporal

Service number          2909

Date of death              13/11/1916

Place of birth               Dundee

Age

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: I. C. 22.

Cemetery: SERRE ROAD CEMETERY No.1        

Son of the late Duncan and Jessie McEwan, Dundee

 

Duncan was the only brother of Mrs. E Anderson,9 Gillons Land, Armadale, whose husband is also serving in France with the Royal Scots and had been there since December 1914.

 

Duncan was a native of Dundee, but prior to enlisting in the Army in June 1914, he had for four years worked in the moulders department of the Atlas Steel Company Ltd., when war broke out he was one of the first drafts to be sent to France, he arrived in France on the 19th December 1914.

Duncan took part in some of the first battles of 1914, and was invalided home with frostbite.

ROBERT McGLASHAN

1st Battalion

BLACK WATCH

Rank                           Private

Service number          9707

Date of death              10/11/1914

Place of birth               Dundee

Age                             

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Dundee

Medal Entitlement       1914 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         France

Grave/Memorial Reference: I. M. 68.

Cemetery: POPERINGHE OLD MILITARY CEMETERY        

Husband of Mrs McGlashan, Railway cottage, Station Road Armadale.

 

Robert was a reservist and he was called up at the outbreak of war, he was one of the first called to the colours, and he arrived in France on the 13th August 1914.

Robert died in Hospital from wounds received, his wife first got a postcard from him stating he was wounded and in hospital, two days later she got word that he died from his wounds.

 

Prior to being called up Robert was chief signalman at Armadale Railway Station.

WILLIAM McGAW

2nd Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          16252

Date of death              22/07/1916

Place of birth               Cambusnethan

Resided                       Armadale & Fauldhouse, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Fauldhouse

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: Pier and Face 6D and 7D

Cemetery: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL 

 

William arrived in France on the 21st April 1915.

In November 1915 whilst serving at the front, William received a football, sent to him by the directors of Armadale Football Club.

 

Mrs. Evans of High Street, Bathgate, received a letter from her oldest brother, Private James McGow, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, notifying her the sad fact that her other Brother William McGow Royal Scots well known in Armadale and Breich districts had been killed by a Sniper on 22nd July.

 

James under the date 28th July writes as follows:

 

“It is with sadness and regret that I write to inform you that brother Willie was killed on Saturday, 22nd July by a Sniper. His regiment came out on 27th July, for a rest to a village near where we were. At night I cleaned myself, and went up to see him, and that was the sad news I got. He was killed just five days before the Regiment came out for a rest. Hard lines after us looking for one another for so long, that the first opportunity I had of meeting, him I should have met with such a disappointment. We have no controlling of our destinies or things would be different. It was not fated that we should meet in life. I need not say I an in no trim for writing. It does not give one much heart to know their brother has been killed, almost by ones side, and to have never seen him, though I could not have done anything for him. I only wish I had seen him before this happened. I know you will be greatly upset, but the lord’s ways are not our ways, and many a bonnie lad has fallen here, and there will be many a sorrowful home before this war is over. I hope this finds you all in the best of health as this leaves me so at present.”

 

Private James McGow also sent at the same time a letter in somewhat similar terms to his other sister, Mrs. Hugh Brown, Fauldhouse. In a closing sentence in this letter he wrote:

 

            “Willie died a soldier’s death on the battlefield doing his duty for King and Country and You. His loss is hard to bear, but we should be proud of the fact that he met his death doing his duty like a Man”

 

 

Private Charles Robertson, under the date, 26th July wrote:

 

“Dear Mrs. Evans

            I am extremely sorry to inform you that your brother Pte William McGow was killed on 22nd July whilst in action. We were caught in a terrible machine gun fire during an attack. He died a hero’s death, and accounted for a good many Germans before he was hit by a bullet in the head. He suffered no pain whatever. We all join in sending our heartfelt sympathy in your loss.”

 

William McGow enlisted at Woodmuir, Fauldhouse in November 1914. he had prior to that date resided for about a year in Fauldhouse and prior to that resided in Armadale first with his sister Mrs. Hugh Brown, and after Mr. & Mrs. Brown went to Fauldhouse, he resided with Mrs. White. Then after a time he to went to Fauldhouse, residing again with his sister before joining the Army. Though he was through many engagements he was never wounded.

ALEXANDER McINULTY

B Company 12th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Formerly        

3270                Ayr Yeom

203580            RSF

Rank                           Private

Service number          273117

Date of death              07/05/1917

Place of birth               Shotts, Lanarkshire

Age                              19

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: III. K. 37.

Cemetery: DUISANS BRITISH CEMETERY, ETRUN

        

Son of Alexander (Purdie) McInulty, of 185, East Main St., Armadale, Linlithgowshire, West Lothian.

Alexander’s father was himself a piper in the Army during the Great War.

 

Alexander first joined the Yeomanry, and later transferred to the Royal Scots Fusiliers, and when only six weeks in the Army he volunteered for the front, and was drafted into the Royal Scots. He was only three months and twelve days in the Army when he died.

 

Alexander was a miner and exempted, but preferred to do his bit in the Army.

HENRY McINULTY

11th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          13342

Date of death              27/09/1915

Place of birth               Shotts, Lanarkshire

Age                             

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 10 to 13.

Cemetery: LOOS MEMORIAL        

 

Son of Alexander (Purdie) McInulty, of 185, East Main St., Armadale, Linlithgowshire, West Lothian.

 

Private Henry McInulty, Westrigg was reported missing after the battle of Loos on 25th September 1915, on the 17th March 1916 Mrs. McInulty, Westrigg was officially notified that Henry had been killed in action on that date (25th September).

Henry enlisted in December 1914 and went to France in around 11th May 1915. 

 

Mrs McInulty received a note from one of Henry’s comrades informing her that they were returning from the trenches, congratulating each other on their escape, when a bomb dropped and killed McInulty.

 

Henry McInulty appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Blackrigg 3 Colliery and being killed in action

WILLIAM McKECHNIE

1/7th Battalion             

ARGYLL & SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS

Rank                           Private

Service number          2437 / 275991

Date of death              23/04/1917     

Place of birth              

Age                              25

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Avonbridge

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: Bay 9.

Cemetery: ARRAS MEMORIAL 

Husband of Catherine Martin Smith (formerly McKechnie), of 3, Gibson St., Gallowgate, Glasgow.

Son of John McKechnie, of 5, Capper's Rows, Armadale, West Lothian;

 

William had been a member of Armadale Football club before the War, and he was a married man with two of a family, his wife and children residing Woodend.

 

William was reported Missing and Wounded on the 23rd April, and then when nothing further was heard he was presumed killed on that day.

 

William McKechnie appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Bathville Colliery and being killed in action

DAVID McKELVIE

ROYAL ENGINEERS

Formerly

Sgt 2572

9th Highland Light Infantry

Rank                           Lieutenant

Date of death              16/09/1918     

Decoration                  MC

Place of birth              

Age                             

Resided                       Armadale

Enlisted                       Glasgow

Medal entitlement       Military Cross, 1914 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

Theatre of death         Home

Grave/Memorial Reference:

Cemetery:  

 

David McKelvie a native of Glasgow, but who for six years prior to enlisting was surveyor of mines for the united Collieries Company Armadale District. He enlisted in September 1914 with the 9th (Glasgow Highlanders) Highland Light Infantry, and he went to France in November 1914. Due to his background as a Mining Engineer, he was transferred to the Royal Engineers with the rank of Lieutenant.

 

In November 1914 David wrote a letter to the Bathville office where he had many friends in it he says that the trench he is lying in is a terrible hole, the worst place in no7 Pit, even a sump hole is a Palace compared with it.

 

In late April 1915 David returned to Armadale on a weeks leave in order to get rigged out in accordance with his rank as a Lieutenant in the Royal Engineers, to which he had been promoted.  While in no way inclined to dwell upon the operations at the front, he makes no bones about expressing the fact that the folk at home have simply no conception of what war means.

 

It was while at Loos in September 1915 he gained the Military Cross for especially successful work in cutting and firing mines in enemy territory.

 

MC. (LG 00/01/1916)

For the admirable manner in which he carried out the arduous and dangerous work of laying four mines under the German trenches, south of hooge. The long period of delay in exploding the mines placed a very heavy strain on those concerned, but due to the keenness and vigilance the operation was an unqualified success, and the success of yesterdays (25th September, 1915) operations was greatly due to the work so admirably performed.

 

David was so badly knocked about with the shock of bursting shells that he suffered from heart strain, and had been relieved from his duty.

 

Temp. 2nd Lt. D. McKelvie, M.C., relinquishes his command on account of ill health and is granted the hon. rank of 2nd Lt. 9th June, 1916.

 

David received his discharge from the Army and returned to his old duties at Armadale again, and sat the examination for the certificate of first class colliery manager, and succeeded, shortly afterwards he was appointed manager of Uddingston Colliery.

 

He contracted a chill, and this followed by an attack of double pneumonia. He succumbed after a few days illness.

 

David was due to be married in October 1918, but unfortunately he died the month prior, David is noted as being one of the most likeable young men that one could meet, and he had a great host of friends who were deeply grieved at him being cut down in the full bloom of manhood.

 

 

Prior to enlisting David was employed as principal surveyor at the United Collieries, Armadale District, he appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Bathville Colliery.

WILLIAM HENRY McKENNA

B Company 14th Battalion

ARGYLL & SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS

Rank                           Private

Service number          278293

Date of death              27/03/1918

Place of birth               Killylea, Co Armagh

Age

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Glencorse

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: Bay 9.

Cemetery: ARRAS MEMORIAL        

 

Husband of Catherine McKenna, 116 West Main Street, Armadale

Father of John Henry McKenna, and Edward McKenna.

 

William was a married man who resided with his wife in West Main Street Armadale.

Before enlisting William was employed as a grocer at Armadale Co-operative Society, Ltd. He entered the Army in November 1916.

 

William was reported missing on the 21st March 1918, the first day of the German spring offensive, after the Government Authorities received no word about William he was presumed killed in action.

JOHN McKEOWN

15th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          30237

Date of death              30/07/1916

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age

Resided                      

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: XXX. A. 12.

Cemetery: SERRE ROAD CEMETERY No.2  

Son of Thomas McKeown, 6 Cappers Row, Armadale

 

Private James McGaffney, Royal Scots, had written to his mother stating that John McKeown was Missing, he then wrote to say that John was a Prisoner of War.

THOMAS McKEOWN

2nd Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          13780

Date of death              25/09/1915

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              20

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 11.

Cemetery: YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL        

Son of Thomas and Eliza McKeown, of Cappers, Armadale, and nephew of John McKeown mount Pleasant Armadale.

 

Thomas enlisted in September 1914 and he was sent to France arriving on the 3rd January 1915. Thomas was a member of 15 Platoon 2nd Royal Scots.

 

The following letter was received by the Courier in May 1915 from an Armadale Soldier serving with the 2nd Royal Scots in France:

 

            “I may say our last experience has been the worst we have had yet. In our ease trenches we had a hot time from Trench Mortars. At night the Germans would put them over at the same time as a star shell to make you think it was a light that was coming. But every time our sentry – Pte T Barbour- spotted them, and he gave his comrades timely warning to clear out. Only one mortar did damage. It knocked in our parapet. Pte T McKeown and his other comrades soon had it rebuilt again. Our Officer said it was a smart piece of work on our part. At day break in the morning our machine guns open fire on the German trenches. We were all standing ready, and we opened a tremendous fire on them. We had no casualties. “

 

The first intimation of Tom’s death was from Private Teddy Gilligen who wrote that Private Tom McKeown was killed on the morning of the 25th September while engaged in charging the enemy. The members of 15 Platoon sent their deepest sympathy to his relatives.

 

Thomas’s brother James was a Gunner in the Artillery and served in the Dardanelles and France.

HUGH McKINNON

7/8th Battalion.

KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS

Rank                           Sergeant

Service number          202122

Date of death              19/08/1917

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              37

Resided                       Bo’ness

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 66 to 68.

Cemetery: TYNE COT MEMORIAL        

Son of John McKinnon Quality Row, South Street, Armadale.

 

Hugh’s wife and children were residing in Bo’ ness with her sister who was recuperating from illness when Hugh was killed.

 

Hugh was an old Territorial with the 10th Royal Scots, he was mobilised in September 1914, and had spent a long period on home defence on the East Coast of Scotland, and he had been in France just over a month before he was killed.

 

Hugh had two brothers also serving in the Army,

Pte Robert McKinnon Royal Scots who was wounded three times during the war, Robert joined up under the Derby Scheme his wife resided in East Main Street, Armadale.

Pte John McKinnon Royal Scots who was also wounded ten months prior to Hugh’s death, at the time of Hugh’s death John was under Doctors orders at East Linton.

HUGH McKINNON

1st /5th Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          1001

Date of death              28/06/1915

Place of birth               Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Age                             

Resided                       Edinburgh

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         Gallipoli

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 26 to 30.

Cemetery: Helles memorial

Son of James McKinnon Haddington Place, Edinburgh. Grandson of Hugh McKinnon Stonerigg Farm, Armadale.

 

Hugh had served 10 years in the Territorial’s with the 5th Royal Scots prior to war, and he was employed with Edinburgh and District Tramway Company.

HUGH McLACHLAN

12th Battalion

HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY

Rank                           Private

Service number          19300

Date of death              17/09/1918

Place of birth               Dumbarton

Age                             

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire    

Enlisted                      

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: XVI. H. 15.

Cemetery: VLAMERTINGHE NEW MILITARY CEMETERY 

Son of Alexander McLachlan, of 5, Burnside St., Dumbarton; husband of Janet Jack McLachlan, of 15, Burnside St., Dumbarton

Hugh arrived in France with the 2nd Battalion Highland Light Infantry on the 29th November 1914.

HENRY McLAUGHLIN

2nd Battalion

HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY

Rank                           Private

Service number          12319

Date of death              29/09/1917

Place of birth               Airdrie

Age

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Hamilton

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: L. 29.

Cemetery: CAMBRIN MILITARY CEMETERY

 

Henry arrived in France on the 23rd November 1914.

JOHN McLAUGHLIN

15th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          14191

Date of death              17/04/1918

Place of birth               Monkland, Lanarkshire

Age                              28

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 11 to 14 and 162.

Cemetery: TYNE COT MEMORIAL        

Husband of Rose Ann Sykes (formerly McLaughlin), of 40, Barbauchlaw Avenue, Armadale.

Son of John McLaughlin, of 48, Barbauchlaw Avenue, Armadale.

 

John enlisted into the Royal Scots in September 1914, and he arrived in France on the 11th May 1915. He had been on active service for over three years before he was killed. John had previously been wounded three times. Prior to enlisting John was employed as a Miner.

DAVID McLAREN

1st/8th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          348014

Date of death              23/07/1918

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              20

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire      

Enlisted                       Linlithgow

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: V1 A. 2.

Cemetery: MARFAUX BRITISH CEMETERY

        

Son of William McLaren, Westrigg Square, Blackridge.

  

David was killed whilst returning to a dressing station, after being wounded in action.

 

In a letter to Mrs. McLaren, Lt WD Armstrong a son in law of Mrs. McKeown, Westrigg writes:

 

            “I offer you my deepest sympathy in the loss of your son, who was serving in our Battalion. I had seen him frequently during the last few months, and he seemed quite happy and content with his lot. Two days before he was killed he was one of a party I took out to reconnoitre a wood for our Battalion to rest in. He was wounded in the attack on the 23rd July. While returning to the dressing station he was hit again. His death was instantaneous. He was buried on the field by our Battalion Chaplain. His Platoon and company Commander speak very highly of his services in the line, and out of it. Will you please accept and convey to the members of your family my sympathy with your sorrow.”

 

 

David joined the Army in early 1916, prior to this he was employed at Polkemmet Colliery.

MATHEW McLAREN

2nd Battalion

GORDON HIGHLANDERS 

Rank                           Sergeant

Service number          1494

Date of death              19/06/1916

Place of birth               Slammannan Stirlingshire

Age                             

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire    

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: V. B. 2.

Cemetery: CITADEL NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, FRICOURT        

Son of Mr. & Mrs. Mathew McLaren Westrigg.

 

Mathew enlisted in the army on the 12th August 1914, and went to France on the 27th November 1914 he had his baptism of fire on the 14th December near Ypres, he also took part in the following engagements – La Bassee, Givenche, Fistubert and Loos.

 

After the battle of La Bassee he was invalided home with frozen feet, when he left the firing line he said his legs were black up to his knees with frost.

After the battle of Loos in Sept 1915 he was home for a well earned leave.

 

On the 5th October 1915 after the battle of Loos Lance Sergeant Mathew McLaren wrote the following letter home:

 

“I have been through the great advance, and come out without a hurt. On the morning of Saturday, 25th September, we were in the fourth line of trenches. We followed the lead and were soon in the centre of the enemy fire – Swiss-Bangs, shrapnel, machine gun, and rifle fire. One of my chums – Calder of Broxburn- was wounded, but I expect he will get home to recuperate. He and I were charging together when he fell. I stopped and dressed him. A bullet struck his left breast, but fortunately a packet of letters kept it from inflicting little more than a deep flesh wound. It was lucky he had that packet of letters.

I am still in the trenches. The place we are holding is only 30 Yards from the enemy, so we have to be on the alert all the time.”

 


Following the official news of his son’s death Mr. McLaren received the following letter from Captain H Brian – Brooke 2nd Gordon Highlanders:

 

“It is with the deepest and most profound regret that I sit down to write you today to tell you the sad news of the death of your gallant son Colour Sergeant Mathew McLaren (No 1494). I know that no words of mine can in any way lessen the great sorrow which the loss of such a son must mean, but as his Company Commander I feel I must drop you a short line to convey to tell you any point concerning your poor boys death which may be of interest to you. 

It was the day before yesterday, 19th June, 9:30 a.m. a heavy high explosive shell fell in our trench, and killed one man, mortally wounded your son and the Company Sergeant Major, and severely wounded two others, who will recover. I was the first to arrive on the spot after the explosion and was with your son from then on until within a short time before his restful death. He lived about half an hour after being wounded. What with the shock at first and the morphia the doctor gave him as soon as he arrived your son suffered comparatively no pain. He was conscious up to the end, and died a brave calm death. We bound him up and sent him off on a stretcher on which he passed peacefully away before he reached the hospital behind the trenches.

I cannot tell you, Mr. McLaren how deeply the whole company feel the loss of your son. As to his platoon (No5) I have never in all the war seen men so cut up. His Platoon Commander told me that night that his men had simply adored him and would have done anything in the world for him and would have done anything in the world for him. 

The loss of my own brother, who was killed with the battalion at the beginning of the war, makes me capable of fully entering into the sorrow of others, and I know what grief yours must be. But I can assure you it is shared by every officer, NCO and man in the regiment. As his Company Commander I feel his loss most deeply, both as the loss of a very fine soldier and one of my most efficient NCOs and also in the loss of a man whom I had become tremendously attached to, as did everyone came in contact with him.

Your son was in my company at King Street Barracks as well as out here, so I know him very well. He was buried yesterday, and when we go out of the trench next I shall take the first opportunity of going to see his grave. The grave committee will keep all the particulars concerning where his grave is.

If there is anything I can do, please let me know.”

DAVID McLURE

2nd Battalion

King's Royal Rifle Corps

attd.

4th Army Musketry School

Rank                           2nd Lt

Service number

Date of death              08/03/1918

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: IV. F. 62.

Cemetery: LONGUENESSE (ST. OMER) SOUVENIR CEMETERY        

Son of Jane McKee (formerly McLure), of 36A, East Main St., Armadale, Linlithgowshire and the late Robert McLure.

 

David joined the Royal Scots in February 1915, he arrived in France on the 1st June 1915, and he served two years in the ranks, (20507 L/Cpl D McLure was wounded in August 1916) and following an act of great gallantry he was promoted from the ranks.

 

He followed the occupation in civil life of a miner.

 

Writing to Mrs. McKee, an officer says:

 

“I deeply regret having to inform you that Lieutenant McLure has died of Pneumonia at an Army School. I cannot tell you how sorry we all are in the Battalion for he had proved himself such a good fellow, and was a splendid Officer. He was so absolutely reliable that one knew if he was holding a post anywhere it was safe. All the officers of the Battalion very deeply regret the loss of such a splendid comrade.”

WILLIAM McMASTER

Mid Lothian Battery

260th Lowland Brigade

ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY

Rank                           Gunner

Service number          1577

Date of death              28/07/1916

Place of birth               Shotts Lanark 

Age                              22

Resided                      

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: IV. B. 7.

Cemetery: FLATIRON COPSE CEMETERY, MAMETZ

Son of William McMaster Main Street, Harthill.

 

William was a Blacksmith before enlisting in the Army, and he was employed by United Collieries.

 

William arrived in France on the 24th October 1915.

 

William McMaster appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Westrigg Colliery and being killed.

ARCHIBALD McMILLAN

15th Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          34050

Date of death              09/04/1917

Place of birth               Torphichen, Linlithgowshire

Age                              27

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: IV. C. 1.

Cemetery: POINT-DU-JOUR MILITARY CEMETERY, ATHIES        

Husband of Barbara McMillan of Muir’s Brickwork Cottage, Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Son of Archibald and Janet McMillan 74 East Main Street, Armadale.

 

Mrs. McMillan, Muir Cottage, South Street, Armadale received the following letter from Lt John D Ferguson:

 

“It is my painful duty to inform you of your husband’s death. He was killed in the afternoon of 12th April. He suffered no pain. I can only offer my deepest sympathy in your great loss and trust you will have strength to bear the trial. Your husband was always bright and cheery, and will be missed by his comrades here”

 

Until two weeks before entering the Army Archie was a dresser in the atlas foundry, then he commenced work as a miner owing to his eyes failing him at the furnace, he enlisted in June 1916, and was sent to France that November, during his six months in France he had been through many hot engagements.

 

Archie and his wife Barbara had one son (Archie) born 4th July 1915 at 35 Etna Cottages, Lower Bathville, Armadale.

 

Barbara Archie’s widow died on 6th March 1920 of Phthisis TB at her parent’s home 95 south street Armadale. After her death Archie, Archie and Barbara’s son was brought up by his mother’s spinster aunt.

 

Archie’ s body was never recovered and he was remembered on a memorial to the missing at Arras, however in 2002 his body was recovered and identified and he has since been buried in France, his 80 year old son and his grandchildren attended his burial.

 

Archie’s brother and Nephew also served with the Royal Scots during the War, his brother Piper John McMillan 13th Royal Scots and the Pipers son Sergeant John McMillan DCM & bar also 13th Royal Scots both resided in Blackridge.

JAMES WILSON McMILLAN

13th Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          14752

Date of death              28/01/1917

Place of birth               Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Age                              22

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: Pier and Face 6 D and 7 D.

Cemetery: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL        

Son of Mr.& Mrs. William McMillan South Street Armadale.

 

Mrs. William McMillan received a word from Captain Gardner, late schoolmaster, Armadale Public School, that her son, Pte James McMillan, Royal Scots, had been killed in action on the evening of the Sabbath 28th January, he and his officer being killed by an enemy shell.

 

Capt A. Gardner MC, TMB 45th GB BEF writing from France under date 29th January says:

 

“Dear Mrs. McMillan,

            I am deeply grieved to inform you that your son, Pte James McMillan, Royal Scots attached to the Trench Mortar Battery was killed last night, 28th January. He was acting as a runner to one of my officers, and was going around the trenches with him, a shell came along and killed both of them. His death was practically instantaneous, and he could not have suffered any pain. We buried him in the trenches just where he fell. He had very few effects on his person, but I have collected them, and you will receive them in due course. He was a good boy and a splendid soldier. He had many rough experiences, but throughout all he carried himself bravely and acquitted himself like a true soldier. As he was an Armadale boy I had rather a warm side for him. I feel deeply grieved for you and the rest of your family. At the moment we, inured to the daily toll of life, we look on calmly when one of our number falls, but when one thinks of grief and suffering of his people, one curses the villainy that brought on the war. May you learn to reap patient submission in place of the bitter grieve you must feel at the moment, think of the noble sacrifice he made for you all, and surely time will bring you happy if chastened memories. Again assuring you of my deepest sympathy.

I remain yours sincerely

 

A Gardner (Captain)”

 

James enlisted shortly after war broke out; he had been in France almost two years, he arrived in France on the 9th July 1915.

 

His last furlough before his death was May 1916. James was unmarried and resided with his parents in South Street; he was a miner before he enlisted.

 

In the Christmas of 1915, he and a German exchanged photographs in “no man’s land” but the incident had led to him getting a reprimand, as an order had been previously issued against exchanges of courtesies with the enemy. 

SAMUEL MENZIES

1st Battalion

SCOTS GUARDS

Rank                           Lance Corporal

Service number          10922

Date of death              31/07/1917

Place of birth               Airdrie

Age                             

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire    

Enlisted                       Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 11.

Cemetery: YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL

       

Son of the late Richard Menzies and of Elizabeth Muir Connor (formerly Menzies), of 49, Westrigg, Blackridge, Linlithgowshire, West Lothian.

Samuel enlisted 14th September 1914, and arrived in France on the 25th February 1915. Samuel was wounded (shock-shell) in early October 1916.

 

Samuel’s mother received the following letters:

 

Lt Irvine writing to Mrs Connor, under the date 8th August says:

 

“Please allow me to express my deepest sympathy with you in the loss of your son, Corporal S Menzies. As you have no doubt heard, it was on the 31st July, when we went over the top that he was killed. He was in charge of the rifle bombing section in my Platoon, and was extremely popular with everyone he had anything to do with. I feel his loss deeply, as not only was he a very efficient NCO, but also a man to be relied on in any crisis.”

 

And also the battalion Chaplain writes:

 

“Dear Mrs. Connor,

            You will by this time have received official intimation of the death in action of your son, Lance Corporal Menzies, Right Flank Company of this Battalion. He was severely wounded on the 31st July and died a few hours after. May I express to you on my own behalf and on behalf of the Battalion, our deep sympathy with you in your loss? Your boy’s death was part of the price we had to pay for victory that day, and in a very real sense he laid down his life for his friends. He was faithful unto death, and even in your sorrow you will be proud of his memory.

Yours in true sympathy,

David Sommerville,

Chaplain

Samuel Menzies appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Blackrigg 3 Colliery and being killed in action.

JOHN MIGHTON

2nd Battalion.

KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS

Rank                           Lance Corporal

Service number          8363

Date of death              13/04/1917

Place of birth               Benhar Lanark

Age                              36

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire      

Enlisted                      

Medal Entitlement       1914 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: IV. D. 16.

Cemetery: BOULOGNE EASTERN CEMETERY   

 

Husband of Catherine Mighton, of Rosebery Place, Oakfield St., Kelty, Fife.

Son of Mr. Joseph Mighton 49 Bathville Row Armadale.

 

John formerly resided with his father at Bathville Row, he had seen service during the Boer War with the Kings Own Scottish Borderers, and was called back to the colours as a Reservist when War broke out, arriving in France on the 11th September 1914.

 

He was to trade a Miner when War broke out, and for some time in France was again a miner while attached to the Royal Engineers, but was back again with his Regiment to the end.

 

Pte Mighton was injured in France in October 1914 at the battle of La Bassee, a fragment of a bursting shell struck him on the heel, carrying away the heel of his boot, tumbling him into the trench in such a way that he received a severe sprain of the leg, his foot having been completely turned round. He was then sent to Becket Park Hospital, Leeds. He was able to obtain three weeks leave, although he was far from being fit.

He spent his leave at home in Armadale, he was in no way inclined to speak of his experience at the front further than to say that the South African War which he was through was not a flea – bite to this war.

 

John was mentioned in dispatches for gallantry in February 1916.

 

Whilst at home on leave the Christmas before his death, he was married at Kelty, where his wife resided when he was killed.

 

John died of wounds in No 3 Canadian General Hospital, France.

The following letter bearing the sad tidings was received by his sister, Mrs Dowie, Bathville Row:

 

“Dear Mrs Dowie

            Your brother, Corporal Mighton, asked me to write to you a few minutes before he passed away on the 13th April. The wound in his arm became infected with septic poisoning, and although all that was possible was done for him, we could not save him. I have written his wife, and she will give you all the particulars.

Yours sincerely

W Burton

Canadian Force”

 

John Mighton appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Bathville Colliery and being killed in action

WALTER MIGHTON

7th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          2399

Date of death              22/05/1915

Place of birth              

Age                              20

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Theatre of death         Home

Grave/Memorial Reference:

Cemetery: EDINBURGH (ROSEBANK) CEMETERY

(KILLED IN THE GRETNA TRAIN CRASH)

Son of William and Sarah Mighten, of 61, Westcraigs Rd., Blackridge, Linlithgowshire, West Lothian.

 

Walter Mighton appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Blackrigg 3 Colliery and being killed at Gretna.

GEORGE MITCHELL

52nd (Lowland) Div. Cyclist Coy.

ARMY CYCLIST CORPS

Formerly

740

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          259

Date of death              04/08/1916

Place of birth               Shotts, Lanarkshire

Age                              21

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         Egypt

Grave/Memorial Reference: E. 315.

Cemetery: KANTARA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY        

Son of David and Jeanie Mitchell, of Parkview, Blackridge, West Lothian.

 

George was a Royal Scots territorial before the war, he was mobilised in August 1914 with the rest of his battalion.

 

George was a member of the Vale of Craig Football Team prior to enlisting, and he was always interested in their doings.

 

George was employed as a miner prior to being called up for service with the 10th Royal Scots.

JOHN MUIRHEAD

2nd Battalion

SCOTS GUARDS

Rank                           Lance Corporal

Service number          12071

Date of death              15/11/1916

Decoration                  MM

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age  

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       Military Medal, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: VIII. B. 13.

Cemetery: BANCOURT BRITISH CEMETERY        

Son of William and Helen Muirhead, 129 South Street Armadale.

 

Military Medal LG 03/06/1916:

 

John was awarded the military medal for his smart reconnaissance work done near Ypres.

 

The Scots Guards were attacked on the site of a brickfield. After a long engagement ammunition gave out, but aided by the butt of their  rifles and the cold steel, with quantities of bricks as missiles the Germans were kept at bay until reinforcements arrived which forced the enemy to beat a hasty retreat.

 

John was the last of three good friends from Armadale who were all serving in the Scots Guards together, the other two Robert Darling and Mathew Campbell being killed before him.

 

John had on several occasions had the opportunity to return to his old position, as electrical engineer on the coal cutting apparatus at Bathville pit, but he resolutely refused himself to be transferred from his regiment. It is noted that John was a lad of straightforward honesty, and at every turn sought to do well the duty that lay to his hand.

 

Private Muirhead was one of the first Boy Scouts in Armadale, and was later a Scoutmaster with the Armadale Boy Scouts, and during the present war he has been frequently out scouting.

 

John was wounded in April 1915 and was sent to Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow to Recover.

 

After John’s death the following letters were received by his mother:

 

Capt E Knollys writes:

 

            “Dear Mrs. Muirhead

                        It is very difficult for me to write this letter, to tell you of the death of your son. To me he was a personal friend, I have been with him so often in the little over a year I have been out here. It was while he was looking for me (I had got separated from the company while trying to find some trenches we had to take over) that he got shot. He and his friend Corporal Drummond got too near to the German trenches, and when they found out there mistake, and made to turn back, your son was shot by a German sniper. He was killed instantaneously. Perhaps it has been some little consolation that he was home so recently. All the time he has been my orderly he has never failed to do his duty and more than his duty. His death is a loss not only to me, but to the whole Company and Battalion. In getting the Military Medal it showed the appreciation his officers had for him, and I am glad that the General himself pinned the ribbon on, and personally thanked him.”

 

 

Charles Hughes wrote:

 

“Corporal Drummond, Corporal Muirhead, Murray (Linlithgow), and myself were great chums. It is with a sad heart I write. You must be brave to be able to bear to read the worst news a mother can get about her son. Poor Jack met his death on Tuesday, 15th November, about 10pm, whilst on patrol duty. He was shot when less than 100 yards from the German trenches. He died a glorious death …………. Your son was a man to be proud of. He was loved by everyone who knew him. He knew no fear, and was a credit to his regiment, and he will always be held up as an example to others in the Battalion. We will miss him as a chum, he was a good one. We could not help but be happy when in his company. Ours is a great loss.”

 

 

John Muirhead appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Bathville Colliery and being killed in action

WILLIAM MURPHY

1st / 5th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          251482

Date of death              07/02/1917

Place of birth              

Age                             

Resided                       Blackridge

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: Plot 2. Row A. Grave 19.

Cemetery: BERTRANCOURT MILITARY CEMETERY

William was the son of Mrs. Jane Murphy, of Blackridge, West Lothian.

 

William was shot for desertion on 7th February 1917.

 

JOHN MURRAY

15th Battalion

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          202268

Date of death              03/01/1919

Place of birth               Clackmannan

Age                              26

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: VII. G. 13.

Cemetery: NIEDERZWEHREN CEMETERY        

Nephew of Mr and Mrs Mathew Lambie, Burnside Terrace, Blackridge.

 

Mrs and Mrs Lambie had been in receipt of post cards, stating that he was well. The last one dated 20th October, was received on the day of the Armistice being signed, and when no further news came from him, and prisoners were nearly all home, grave doubts were felt that all was not well. Mr Lambie then advertised in the newspapers for news of his nephew, and letters were received from the following soldiers:

 

Pte James Owen, Seaforths, Glasgow. Said that private John Murray died in Gottengen, from heart failure and starvation, on 3rd January 1919. he went on to say that it was not an uncommon thing to see Private Murray being struck on the back, when lying very ill, with the butt of a Rifle. The food supplied was very poor, and meagre in amount. It is true that Private Murray received parcels from home through the red cross society, but he was too ill to eat anything from them, so they were on to his fellow prisoners.

 

CSM DW Williams, writing from Nottingham, said that there was no doubt what so ever but Private John Murray who died suffering from dysentery, and was buried at a public cemetery in Gottengen.

 

LCpl J Wylie 16th Black Watch, Salcoates, Ayrshire, said that he and Private Murray were together at Hospital in Mons, suffering from Dysentery, Then later at a camp in Germany, where Murray died on the 3rd January.

 

Each correspondent gave the correct regimental number and there evidence all points conclusively to the fact that Private John Murray must have passed away at Gottenburgh, on the 3rd January1919.

 

When war broke out John was not long home from his Territorial Army annual Camp, he was a Private in the 10th (Cyclists) Battalion the Royal Scots, and was mobilised with his battalion in August 1914 and served for two years on the East Coast of Scotland, he went to France in 1916.

John was wounded twice, once in the knee, and another time in the left arm.

 

John Murray appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Southrigg Colliery and dying whilst Prisoner of war.

JOHN MURRAY

7th Battalion

SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS

Rank                           Private

Service number          1569

Date of death              12/10/1915

Place of birth               Rogart, Sutherlandshire

Age                              19

Resided                       Armadale

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: I. 37.

Cemetery: ROGART NEW CEMETERY  

Son of William Murray, of Little Rogart.

 

John arrived in France on the 10th May 1915.

John wounded in France on 25th Sept 1915.

The nature of his wounds, left foot shattered by shrapnel. It was decided to amputate the left foot. Though at first it looked as if the operation was to prove a success, three days after the operation took a turn for the worse and passed away.

 

Pte Murray was a native of Rogart, Sutherland where his people reside. He had however, for several years prior to his joining in August 1914, worked as a Shoemaker with his uncle Mr. Matheson, Shoe Warehouse, West Main Street, Armadale.

Pte Murray was of a Kindly, Cheery disposition and was loved by all who came in contact with him.

 

GEORGE R NEALLY

1st Battalion.

KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS

Rank                           Private

Service number          26234

Date of death              16/05/1918

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              36

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Glencorse

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: II. B. 22.

Cemetery: EBBLINGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY        

Son of George and Margaret Neally, of East Main St., Armadale, Linlithgowshire, West Lothian.

 

George enlisted on 15th August 1916, and had been on active service for 17 months prior to his death.

 

Mrs Margaret Neally received word that her son George had been severely wounded by gunshot on the shoulder, and was in hospital, the following week she was informed George had died from his wounds.

 

George’s brother James was also killed in action, whilst a third brother Joseph was wounded.

JAMES NEALLY

17th Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Sergeant

Service number          40943

Date of death              30/09/1918

Decoration                  M.M.

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       Military Medal, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: II. D. 25.

Cemetery: ZANTVOORDE BRITISH CEMETERY        

Husband of Mrs. James Neally, Mount Pleasant Armadale.

Son of George and Margaret Neally, of East Main St., Armadale, West Lothian.

 

James joined the 7th Royal Scots in December 1914, and  was sent to France in around August 1915. He was wounded during the battle of Cambrai in 1917 but never left France.

 

In a Divisional order, issued on 24th September 1917, James was specially mentioned for gallant conduct. He again in September 1917 received special mention, and was awarded the Military Medal.

James was promoted Sergeant the day before his death.

 

Mrs. Neally received the following letter from Sergeant Thomas Simpson, of Bo’ness:

 

“I deeply regret to send you the sad news of the death of your husband. While in charge of his Platoon, on 30th September, taking part in the great offensive, he fell. Death was instantaneous. Your husband had been specially mentioned the day before for his good work. Your husband, while leading his platoon towards a nest of enemy machine guns, met his death in the hour of victory. He was buried on the field of battle by the men of his Platoon. Your husband was a great favourite with both officers and men. Please accept the deepest sympathy from officers, NCO’s and men”

 

After surviving the Gretna Rail Crash he was interviewed by the Linlithgowshire Gazette, he said

 

 “He had never seen or heard of anything more terrible than that which had happened. There was about 500 of us together, eight in each compartment, most of us were sleeping. The other boys were sitting up smoking and talking. Then came the awful smash. My god what a Smash it was. When the collision happened there were awful explosions in all directions, and the train burst into flames at once. Men were thrown in all directions and were crushed to pieces against the goods train. It was horrible. I would far rather have been out in Flanders. We bandaged one another up as best we could, and the flames were bursting out around us.”

 

 

James leaves a widow and one child to mourn his loss. His brother George (Above) was also killed in action.

 

James Neally appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Armadale Colliery and being killed in action

JAMES NEWLANDS

10th Battalion (Alberta Regiment)

Canadian Infantry

Rank                           Private

Service number          904012

Date of death              15/08/1917

Place of birth              

Age                             

Resided                      

Enlisted                      

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: III. B. 8.

Cemetery: LOOS BRITISH CEMETERY

 

Private Newlands was a native of Blackridge, and he emigrated to Canada early in 1912, where for some time he worked as a ledger keeper for the Merchants Bank of Canada. Later he was appointed to the staff of the North American Life Assurance Company, where he rose rapidly to the important position of Inspector of Agencies.

 

He joined the colours early in 1916, and for splendid recruiting work he was promoted to the rank of Sergeant. Going in for special in for special study, he gained his Lieutenancy. He came with his Battalion to London about Christmas time 1916. The Regiment was kept in training so long, that Lieutenant Newlands, along with some brother officers volunteered and went to the front as Privates in May 1917.

PETER NIMMO

7th Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS

Rank                           PRIVATE

Service number          12906

Date of death              12/05/1916

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              28

Resided                       North Shields

Enlisted                       Ayr

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: IV. E. 17.

Cemetery: VERMELLES BRITISH CEMETERY 

Husband of Christina Latimer (formerly Nimmo), of 14 North St., North Shields.

 

Peter arrived in France on the 10th July 1915.

WILLIAM NIMMO

10th Battalion.

CAMERONIANS (SCOTTISH RIFLES)

Rank                           Private

Service number          16536

Date of death              16/08/1916

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              26

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         France

Grave/Memorial Reference: VII. C. 25.

Cemetery: WARLOY-BAILLON COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION        

Son of the Late Mr. & Mrs. John Nimmo.

 

William died in Hospital from wounds received in action.

 

His mother Mrs. Galloway, 45 East Main Street received the following letter from the hospital in France:

 

“Dear Mrs. Galloway

 

            I am very sorry indeed to have to tell you of the death of your son, Private William Nimmo, Scottish Rifles, who died in this hospital the night before last from wounds. He was brought in suffering from abdominal wounds, and in a very collapsed condition; but although the surgeons and sisters did all they possibly could for him, he never improved, and died at 1 am on the 16th. The greatest comfort was that he did not suffer pain after he came in here. He will be buried today by the chaplain in the village cemetery of Warloy.

With deepest sympathy.

Yours sincerely

T M Whyte

Sister”

 

William enlisted in October 1914, and went to France on the 11th July 1915.

 

William was through the battle of Loos and many more Battles.

WILLIAM NIMMO

7th Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Lance Corporal

Service number          2361

Date of death              28/06/1915

Place of birth  

Age                              21

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         Gallipoli

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 26 to 30.

Cemetery: HELLES MEMORIAL        

Son of William Nimmo Woodend, Armadale.

 

William arrived in Gallipoli on the 12th June 1915.

 

William Nimmo appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Blackrigg 1 Colliery and being killed in action Gallipoli.

MICHAEL JOSEPH O'CONNOR

3rd Battalion

ROYAL IRISH REGIMENT

Rank                           Private

Service number          8504

Date of death              27/09/1916

Place of birth              

Age                              30

Resided                       Armadale 

Enlisted                       Edinburgh

Medal Entitlement       1914 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         Home

Grave/Memorial Reference: Plot 2.

Cemetery: TEMPLEMORE CATHOLIC CEMETERY

Son of William O'Connor.

Husband of Margaret O'Connor, of 135, East Main St., Armadale, West Lothian.

 

Michael went to France with his Battalion on the 13th August 1914, he was severely wounded at the Battle of Mons in the early days of the war, and for some time was engaged on civilian work.

 

Michael died while engaged on Government work in Ireland, he fell from scaffolding and fractured his skull, from the effects of which he later died.

GEORGE M OGG

10th /11th Battalion

HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY

Rank                           Company Sergeant Major

Service number          19551

Date of death              09/04/1918

Place of birth               Hamilton

Age                              28

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Hamilton

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: VI. B. 10.

Cemetery: PONT-DU-HEM MILITARY CEMETERY, LA GORGUE    

Husband of Mrs. Ogg 156 Westrigg.

 

George was a reservist, and when war broke out he was called to the colours, he arrived in France on the 11th May 1915.

 George was a native of Hamilton, and was employed as a signalman at Westcraigs Railway Station.

 

Company Sergeant Major Ogg led his men into the attack early in the morning on the 9th April, the attack was put in under heavy enemy shell fire, only a few of the men survived the attack, one man believed that Sergeant Major Ogg had been taken prisoner, as some of the front rank got through and were surrounded by the Germans.

 

 

In September 1915 Sgt Ogg as he was then was wounded at the battle of Loos.

George married Miss MacKay in1916.

HENRY O'HARE

1st Battalion

KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS

Formerly

18858

Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)

Rank                           Private

Service number          19212

Date of death              17/11/1916

Place of birth               Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Age                              40

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                      

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: Pier and Face 4 A and 4 D.

Cemetery: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL        

Son of Mrs. Mary Jane O'Hare, of 27, Hunter St., Lochgelly, Fife

Brother of Mr. Owen O’Hare 14 Cappers, Armadale Station, treasurer Armadale children’s Galaday committee.

 

Private Henry O’Hare enlisted in the Royal Garrison Artillery in October 1914, and he was later transferred to the Kings Own Scottish Borderers.

Henry saw service at the Dardanelles arriving in Gallipoli on the 24th September 1915, taken part in the evacuation of Gallipoli in late 1915 and there after serving in France.

Henry was a miner before he enlisted in the Army, he and his widow mother moved from Armadale to Lochgelly just before the outbreak of War.

 

The following two verses were put in the Linlithgowshire Gazette, Births, Marriages and deaths:

 

Somewhere abroad, in peace he lies,

The spot we cannot tell

But in our hearts, of the days gone by,

Fond memories ever dwell

 

Mrs. Mary Jane O'Hare, of 27, Hunter St., Lochgelly, Fife

No loved one stood beside him

 

To bid a last farewell,

No word of comfort could he leave

To those he loved so well.

It may be a soldier’s honour

At his country’s call to fall

But we cannot think of the glory

With the sorrow it causes to all

Brother of Mr. Owen O’Hare 14 Cappers, Armadale Station

JAMES W OMAN

4th Battalion

SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS

Formerly

26297 Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)

Rank                           Private

Service number          202401

Date of death              19/09/1917

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              33

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Glencorse

Medal Entitlement       War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F. & F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 132 to 135 and 162A.

Cemetery: TYNE COT MEMORIAL        

Husband of Eleanor Oman, 19 North Street Armadale.

 

Mrs Oman received a letter from Pte William Brodie, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, and a chum of her husbands, to the effect that her husband had not returned after a recent engagement, and it was feared he was killed. Shortly after receiving this letter she received another letter from one of her husband’s officers to the same effect, but stating that nothing definite could be stated, since no one had seen him fall, and it was hoped that he had been taken prisoner of war.

 

Before enlisting James was a lorry man with Russell Brothers, wholesale fruiterers, West Main Street Armadale, his wife and three children reside North Street Armadale.

ROBERT PALLARD

2nd Battalion

HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY

Rank                           PRIVATE

Service number          8977

Date of death              08/11/1914

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                             

Resided                       Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Glasgow

Medal Entitlement       1914 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         F & F

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 38.

Cemetery: YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL   

Husband of Margaret Pallard (nee Johnston) 80 Mid Street, Bathgate.

Son of the late William Pallard, of Bathgate, West Lothian;

 

Robert was a reservist and he had previously served with his Regiment in India for three years being stationed at Calcutta, Robert was called up in August 1914 when war broke out. He rejoined his old Battalion and was with one of the first divisions to arrive in France 14th August 1914.

 

Robert was killed in action on Sunday the 8th November 1914.

 

A doctor from Bathgate who had sent Robert some tobacco received a note from the Quartermaster of the 2nd HLI stating that the tobacco had been shared amongst Robert’s comrades.

 

Prior to being called up Robert was employed at the Deans Oil Works, Robert left a widow and two daughters Margaret and Ella.

JOSEPH PLANT

13th Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Acting Corporal

Service number          15633

Date of death              11/05/1916

Place of birth               Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Age                              24

Resided                       Armadale, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Bathgate, Linlithgowshire

Theatre of death         F.& F.

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 10 to 13.

Cemetery: LOOS MEMORIAL        

Son of George and Martha Plant, of 9, Barbauchlaw Avenue, Armadale.

 

Joseph enlisted in October 1914, and he arrived in France on the 9th July 1915 with his Battalion.

 

Joseph Plant appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Armadale Colliery and being killed in action.

MARTIN PRENTICE

7th Battalion.

ROYAL SCOTS

Rank                           Private

Service number          2523

Date of death              28/06/1915

Place of birth               Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Age                              20

Resided                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Enlisted                       Blackridge, Linlithgowshire

Medal Entitlement       1915 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal

Theatre of death         Gallipoli.

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 26 to 30.

Cemetery: HELLES MEMORIAL        

Son of Mr. & Mrs. John Prentice, Craig Terrace Blackridge.

Mr. & Mrs. Prentice received official information that their son Martin was listed as missing on 28th June 1915 at the Dardanelles.

 

Martin arrived at Gallipoli on the 12th June 1915.

 

Martin Prentice appears on The United Collieries Limited, active service roll 1914-19, this shows him as being employed at Westrigg Colliery and being killed in action -/06/1917